Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Linux Motif Development Toolkit Update

Some of my coworkers have been busy testing new features and updating artwork for our development tool for custom applications. To this day, nothing else allows you to rapidly build business applications and everyone is pretty happy with it. Motif added anti-aliased fonts recently, and with some Tango artwork the programs really look much nicer. GNOME themes automatically set old X resources, so the applications are now coming up in the same colors that users have selected. Not a lot of time invested, and huge gains already in appearance.

The toolkit we use is called Panther, and is from a company called Prolifics.


10 comments:

Anonymous said...

yes, that looks great :)

Hongli Lai said...

Motif like this still looks ugly, but much better than 1999-era apps.

Dave Richards said...

hongli lai: We know that GTK applications have some nicer widgets, but there is no development toolkits that let you build applications as quickly as this one. So we are updating as best we can and getting it looking the best we can. This look and feel is perfect for business type apps.

jospoortvliet said...

If you want to build your apps quickly, why not have a look at Qt? It's a very complete toolkit, pretty high level etc.

And if you did and decided motif is faster for app development, I'd love to hear more about that.

Anonymous said...

Yeah I have to say that now Qt is LGPL, I can't see a reason to use anything else. Especially GTK which is a mass of C-trying-to-be-C++ ugliness.

Dave Richards said...

QT and GTK don't meet our needs. We aren't writing any low level code at all. With this tool, you connect to the database and drop and drag the fields into summary and detail screens and put in a few database commands and everything just works. No low level programming, threads, or signals. This is not old school Motif development, it's just the 3G toolkit uses motif for their widgets. You can write entire systems in just a few hours.

The code is also stored in a client library, that runs cross platform. If you write code for Linux, you can move it to Windows and use the Win32 runtime engine from this company and it just works.

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